Raglan Ashton

Called 1994

Raglan Ashton is a specialist criminal Barrister who has extensive experience and expertise in all aspects of criminal law. He regularly conducts high profile and complex cases both locally and nationally. He represents clients in the Crown Court, Court of Appeal and Divisional Court.
His practice includes representing clients on allegations of murder, robbery, child pornography, rape, fraud, possession of firearms, arson and violence.
Raglan was Called to the Bar in 1994 and worked as an Associate in the Royal Courts of Justice before joining Tuckers Solicitors.
Cases
• R v Smith and Others: The leading case concerning the proper structure and formulation of Sexual Offences Prevention Orders.
• R v Peters: Case concerning appropriate sentence for international drug trafficking.
• R v Nelson: Successful appeal against the imposition of a sentence of imprisonment for public protection in relation to an armed robbery; the judge erred in fact specific judgment when assessing the degree of future risk of serious injury to the public posed by the Appellant.
• R v Fairhurst: Case concerning the legitimate expectation given to the Appellant where the judge made an unlawful assertion to the Appellant about appropriate sentence.
• R v Arun Thear: Multi-handed international fraud with over a million pages of evidence.
• R v Thuy-An Mao: Manslaughter case involving complex medical evidence relating to burn injuries.
• R v Bredan O’Dell: Murder; stabbing where complex issues are of dying declarations made by the deceased at the scene and issue of compellability of spouse giving evidence against partner.
• R v Gary Butteroworth: Case involving international drug trafficking.
• R v Dennis Anderson: Alleged historic rape of step-children; case turned on calling of expert evidence that established that complainant had fabricated account.
• R v Roger Goron: Multi-handed murder where complex issues of cell-site analysis and consideration of legal issue of joint enterprise.

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